Time drags, time flies: A decade in marketing research

As we approach the 10th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks this weekend, it seems a good time to take a few minutes to reflect not only on that tragic day but also on all the changes that have taken place over the last decade. In some aspects the last 10 years have flown by – the image of the towers falling seems like yesterday and I can’t believe my baby girl just entered the third grade. On the other hand, 10 years seems like an eternity. In 2001 Friends was the No. 1 television – when it seems like it’s been reruns for an eternity – and Super Bowl champ and NFL “vet” Tom Brady started in his first game.

As I reflect on the last 10 years in the marketing research industry, I am struck by the number of new tools and techniques that are now available. Smartphones and iPads; social networks and online panels; online qual and neuromarketing – to name a few.

There are some in the industry that claim that marketing research is dying but I, for one, disagree. While I believe the industry is changing and evolving, I believe all the new tools and techniques make the the industry more dynamic and make marketing research available to a much broader audience.

I eagerly await the next 10 years and wonder what’s going on right now that will make an impact. What are your reflections and thoughts on marketing research over the last 10 years?

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3 Responses to Time drags, time flies: A decade in marketing research

  1. Indeed, can’t believe you didn’t mention text analytics though ;)

  2. Marketing Research has been moving at the speed of sound and then the recession hit. Now Markering reseach is changing at the speed of light. Innovate or die. Last week I was at the Pangborn Symposium and noticed themes of social media, measuring emotions, utility of ‘check all that apply’, and Bayesian networks. Most companies today make great products/prototypes and research agencies report dead heat ties at the finish line on overall accpetability. Hence, agencies are developing 21st century tools to test and diagnose 21st century products, e.g., emotional/experiential profiling and developing Bayesian networks.

  3. Brooke says:

    “There are some in the industry that claim that marketing research is dying but I, for one, disagree. While I believe the industry is changing and evolving, I believe all the new tools and techniques make the the industry more dynamic and make marketing research available to a much broader audience.”

    I agree completely!